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Prednisolone for Veterinary Use

For Veterinary Practices
Prescribe Now
For Pet & Horse Owners
Manage Your Prescriptions

By Evan Ware, DVM

Overview

Therapeutic Class
Glucocorticoid

Species
Dogs, Cats, and Horses

May Be Prescribed by Vets for:
Inflammation, immunosuppression, pruritis, recurrent airway obstruction in horses

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Basic Information

Prednisolone Acetate is an adrenocortical steroid that is used to reduce inflammation in dogs, cats, horses, and cattle. It is administered in the form of eye drops but also is available as an injectable solution. Its efficacy is well known, and it is widely prescribed by veterinarians.

Veterinary Medicine Uses for Prednisolone Acetate

Prednisolone binds with glucocorticoid receptors and influences cell behavior by acting as a catalyst to produce some proteins, and as an inhibitor to synthesize others, suppressing inflammation and immune response in the process.

In veterinary medicine, Prednisolone Acetate is prescribed to treat pain and inflammation resulting from surgery, injuries, and infections.

Potential Side-Effects of Prednisolone Acetate

If pregnant animals ingest Prednisolone Acetate, premature birth or birth defects can result, so caution is urged when giving Prednisolone Acetate to nursing animals.

Pet owners should be alert for itching, facial swelling, respiratory distress, or other bothersome side effects.

Precautions for Using Prednisolone Acetate

Prednisolone Acetate ophthalmic solution should not be administered to animals who are allergic to any of the ingredients it contains. Alternate formulations free of potential allergens may be available from pharmacies specializing in pharmaceutical compounding.

It important not to begin treatment with Prednisolone Acetate in animals who have ulcers of the eye, as it can cause this condition to worsen. Prednisolone Acetate can result in fungal or bacterial infections if used for extended periods of time.

Do not suddenly discontinue this medication for animals who have been treated with it for several weeks, as doing so can cause very serious adverse effects.

About the Author

Dr. Evan Ware

Dr. Evan Ware is a veterinary practitioner in Phoenix, Arizona. He received both his undergraduate degree in microbiology and his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from The Ohio State University.

Dr. Ware is currently the Medical Director of University Animal Hospital (VCA) and is also the owner of two other hospitals, including Laveen Veterinary Center and Phoenix Veterinary Center. His areas of expertise include orthopedic medicine and surgery, veterinary oncology and chemotherapy, and general and advanced soft-tissue surgery.

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